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The Davek Mini umbrella from our favorite brand is 20% off right now

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This palm-sized umbrella from our favorite brand is 20% off right now (Photo: Reviewed.com)

— Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from USATODAY’s newsroom and any business incentives.

Summer is almost here, which means thunderstorm season is nearly upon us too. There’s nothing quite like getting caught in the rain without an umbrella, but what if you could always be prepared without needing to tote around a massive umbrella?

That’s where the Davek Mini comes in. This 7-inch umbrella, made by a brand we love, is so small you can carry it in your pocket, but when the skies open up the Mini still stands up to harsh weather like a pro. It’s a happy medium between quality and price, and right now, it’s even happier thanks to a great deal.

This umbrella is so small you can even keep it in your pocket. (Photo: Davek)

Right now, and through midnight, EST, on May 25, you can take advantage of Davek’s flash sale. With the code MWA23, you’ll be able to knock $10 off the $50 price tag. For $40, you can get an umbrella that’s small enough to keep handy all the time in case the weather turns. You won’t find that combo in any $5 convenience store umbrella!

Oh, and did I mention you can choose from EIGHT different colors? You can choose from classic black, deep red, royal blue, plum, cocoa, pink, navy, kelly green, yellow, or turquoise.

Prices are accurate at the time this article was published, but may change over time.

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At tech companies, egg freezing benefits are all the rage

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When Leslie Kennedy landed a job at Facebook and moved from New York to California, she hadn’t given much thought to having a family. She was 30, single and focused on her career.

“I always knew that if I were to have a family, there were options — whether it be adoption or egg freezing or being one rock-star aunt,” Kennedy says. “I knew I had a very fulfilling life ahead of me, so it felt like I didn’t have that pressure.”

screen-shot-2017-05-23-at-10-17-32-am.png

Aaron Robinson/CNET

After a couple of years at Facebook, Kennedy learned the social network was expanding its family-planning benefits to offer everything from adoption assistance to paid surrogacy to egg freezing. That’s unusual. Most U.S. companies don’t even offer paid maternity leave, much less egg freezing. Those types of benefits are expensive.

Egg freezing costs at least $10,000 a shot. It involves a surgical procedure in which a doctor retrieves eggs from a woman’s ovaries and then freezes them for use at a later date. While conceiving naturally can be difficult for women in their late 30s and 40s, research suggests they can carry a baby to term well into their 50s.

Although Kennedy wasn’t really thinking of getting her eggs frozen, she began to hear lots of buzz around the office as colleagues took advantage of the benefit.

“It just came up if you were above 30 and single,” Kennedy says.

So at 33 and just beginning a new relationship, she decided to take the plunge.

Facebook was the first tech company to announce it would pay for egg freezing — both for female staff and the spouses of its employees. That was in 2014. Soon after, Apple started offering it as a benefit too.

Today, at least a dozen tech companies have jumped on board — from Google to Uber to Yahoo.

“In 2016 we introduced a cryopreservation benefit that covers the freezing, storage and thawing of oocytes [egg cells], sperm and embryos,” says Carolyn Clark, Yahoo’s head of global internal communications. “Cryopreservation is part of a suite of family benefits that Yahoo offers, including generous parental leave program, infertility benefits, adoption assistance and more.”

Tech companies are known for offering impressive perks — like gourmet food, massages and dry cleaning — to attract employees. They’re also under pressure to attract more female employees to their mostly male workforces. Those two issues have put egg freezing and other fertility benefits on the vanguard of what tech companies are offering to entice and hold onto employees.

“I’m seeing big reasons why this policy has come to the front,” says Dan Bernstein, senior consultant at human resources consulting firm Mercer. “The first and foremost is the significant war for talent among high-tech companies, including the real need to attract and retain the best and brightest women.”

Trending

Tucked away on the second floor of a downtown San Francisco building is Spring Fertility, a high-tech clinic and lab that caters to people who work in Silicon Valley. Women who work at Google, Facebook and Yahoo go in and out of the center’s sleek white waiting room. And its client base is growing.

“What percent are from tech companies? A lot,” says Dr. Peter Klatsky, co-founder and director of fertility preservation at the clinic. “We understand the millennial and tech demographic.”

Klatsky says Spring Fertility does about 90 procedures a month, including in vitro fertilization and egg freezing. He says it’s important to understand his patients are busy, so Spring works with their schedules.

“They’re an optimistic group who are trying to schedule this between a wine tasting and a business meeting,” Klatsky says.

Many of Spring’s patients come by way of a fertility benefits company called Progyny. Essentially the middleman between tech companies and fertility clinics, Progyny is a kind of concierge service that gives women advice and helps them find the right fertility center.

“There’s no question that the most innovative coverage and the early adopters of our Progyny program were, in fact, the tech companies,” says Karin Ajmani, president of health care services for Progyny. “And then other industries took notice.”

Ajmani says roughly half of the employers Progyny now works with aren’t in tech. That’s notable given that, before 2013, egg freezing was considered an experimental procedure by the American Society of Reproductive Medicine. Now, about 5 percent of all U.S. companies with 500 or more employees cover egg freezing, according to Mercer’s 2016 survey of employer-sponsored health plans.

Besides Facebook, Apple, Google, Uber and Yahoo, several other top tech companies also confirmed they’re offering egg freezing as a benefit to both their female staff and the spouses of employees. This includes Netflix, Snapchat, Intel, eBay, Time Warner, Salesforce, LinkedIn and Spotify.

#LetsChill

Shortly after Facebook and Apple announced the new egg freezing benefit, two invitations started regularly floating around the San Francisco corporate world.

One was for #LetsChill egg freezing cocktail parties, hosted by Progyny’s sister company EggBanxx. The other was for a “girls’ night out” with the fertility specialist, also known as the “egg whisperer,” Dr. Aimee Eyvazzadeh. Both parties, which still go on, aim to inform women about their fertility and remove any stigma about egg freezing.

What Facebook and Apple have done is make this part of a dinner-time conversation,” Eyvazzadeh says. “It’s almost like they legitimized the process for women.”

Not everyone is thrilled with the benefit, however.

Critics say egg freezing implies women should focus on their careers and delay having children. They also say tech companies should concentrate on a better work-life balance and provide more child care, rather than ways to delay it. When new details about Apple’s 175-acre campus were released last week, many commented that it doesn’t have onsite day care.

“There’s an interesting dynamic with tech companies turning to this new fertility technology,” says Rene Almeling, a sociologist at Yale and author of “Sex Cells: The Medical Market for Eggs and Sperm.”

“They think technology can solve lots of problems, including women’s biological clocks.”

Women freeze their eggs for a variety of reasons. Some put their careers first, others have illnesses like cancer that affect their fertility, and some don’t have anyone in their lives to start a family with.

A 2013 survey by the American Society for Reproductive Medicine found that 80 percent of women who froze their eggs did so because they didn’t have a partner, while 19 percent said, “workplace inflexibility contributed to their reproductive dilemma.”

Kennedy says it’s about choice.

“If I want to have kids on my own, I have an option,” she says. “And if there are issues with me having children, I have a backup.”


Solving for XX: The industry seeks to overcome outdated ideas about “women in tech.”

CNET Magazine: Check out a sample of the stories in CNET’s newsstand edition.

This article originally appeared on CNET.



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Brennan’s explosive testimony just made it harder for the GOP to protect Trump

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Former CIA director John Brennan testified May 23 before the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence about Russia’s influence on the 2016 presidential election. (The Washington Post)

In his testimony before the House Intelligence Committee hearing this morning, former CIA director John Brennan bluntly told lawmakers that during the 2016 election, he reviewed intelligence that showed “contacts and interactions” between Russian actors and people associated with the Trump campaign. By the summer of 2016, Brennan said, he was “convinced” that Russia was engaged in an “aggressive” and “multi-faceted” effort to interfere in our election — and as a result, he believed “there was a sufficient basis of information and intelligence that required further investigation” by the FBI.

With this testimony, Brennan just made it a whole lot harder — politically, at least — for the GOP to continue in its efforts to protect Trump, even as scrutiny of his campaign intensifies on the part of the FBI, and now, special counsel Robert Mueller. Yet if today’s hearing is any guide, Congressional Republicans are still intent on shielding Trump by undermining the investigation in the mind of the public.

And so, again and again, Republican members of the Committee, particularly South Carolina’s Trey Gowdy, tried to get Brennan to say that no evidence of Trump campaign collusion with Russian meddling in the election exists. But Brennan repeatedly refused to render a judgment on whether there was collusion. Instead, he only repeated his refrain that, because the CIA is not a law enforcement agency, he turned over its intelligence gathering about contacts between the Trump camp and Russians to the FBI, so that the FBI could conduct its investigation into whether there was collusion.

Indeed, in one of the most important moments, Brennan’s testimony ended up making it very clear that there was a sufficient intelligence basis for the FBI to conduct an investigation into whether those “contacts and interactions” amounted to collusion.

The result of this was that, by trying to get Brennan to say there was no collusion, Republicans made it overwhelmingly obvious that they are trying to undermine the investigation, or at least erode public confidence in it — as is Trump.

It’s crucial here to fully grasp the backdrop of today’s hearing. Just yesterday, the Post broke yet another bombshell story: Trump had personally tried to get both the Director of National Intelligence, Daniel Coats, and the director of the National Security Agency, Michael Rogers, to publicly deny that there was any collusion between the Trump camp and the Russians. The Trump requests came after then-FBI director James Comey testified before the House Intelligence Committee on March 20th and publicly confirmed, for the first time, that the bureau was investigating “the nature of any links between individuals associated with the Trump campaign and the Russian government and whether there was any coordination between the campaign and Russia’s efforts.”

The Washington Post’s Adam Entous explains how President Trump asked two top ranking intelligence officials to publicly deny any connection between his campaign and Russia. (Whitney Leaming/The Washington Post)

Both men refused Trump’s entreaties. Then, on March 9th, Trump fired Comey, one day before meeting with Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov and Ambassador to the U.S.. Sergey Kislyak. The New York Times subsequently reported that Trump had told the Russian officials that he had fired “nut job” Comey to relieve “great pressure” from the Russia investigation.

It’s remarkable, then, that in the face of this deeply damning series of stories about the president’s conduct, House Republicans would take up his defense by using the opportunity to cross-examine Brennan — in hopes of undercutting the idea that an investigation is even needed. Today, less than a day after the story about Trump’s efforts to sway Coats and Rogers provoked instant comparisons to Watergate, House Intelligence Committee Republicans showed little interest in furthering public understanding — or even their own — of this unprecedented scandal.

Brennan, however, offered testimony that should only serve to deepen the curiosity about what really happened for anyone watching the hearing or its highlights. He repeatedly expressed his deep concerns about the intelligence showing numerous “contacts” between the Trump camp and Russian actors who were engaged in efforts to subvert our democracy.

Indeed, if the GOP cross-examination was intended to help Trump, it failed. At one point Gowdy demanded to know whether the evidence of collusion was “circumstantial or direct.” Brennan, who reminded lawmakers that the CIA engages in intelligence gathering and assessments, not criminal investigations and prosecutions, repeated that he knew only of “contacts and interactions.” And those, he said, made him concerned “because of known Russian efforts to suborn” targeted individuals. Those “efforts to suborn,” he elaborated, begin with Russians targeting and then cultivating people of influence or who are “rising stars,” to “try to get them to do things don their behalf.”

Former CIA director John Brennan testified May 23 before the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence about Russia’s influence on the 2016 presidential election. (The Washington Post)

It was his knowledge of how those Russian efforts work that made his radar go up, said Brennan, even though frequently the American involved might be an unwitting target. There are “contacts that may have been totally totally innocent and benign as well as those that may have succumbed somehow to those Russian efforts,” Brennan said. Often, he added in an ominous moment, “individuals who go along a treasonous path do not even realize they’re along that path until it gets to be a bit too late.”

Yet Republicans didn’t seem interested in learning anything from Brennan’s knowledge of how Russian active measures work. Instead they focused on trying to discredit any investigation. At one point, Gowdy directly demanded Brennan provide evidence of collusion; at another he asked Brennan if there was any evidence of collusion between Russian state actors and Trump himself. But all these lines of questioning failed to elicit any exoneration from Brennan. Any such information, Brennan told Gowdy, is “appropriately classified.” What’s more, Brennan said, “this committee has access to the documents we would have provided to the bureau.”

Each time Gowdy or another Republican pressed, Brennan had another opportunity to refer to “contacts” between Russian actors and the Trump campaign, thus amplifying the fact that such interactions had, in fact, taken place. The congressional Republicans’ efforts — like Trump’s — backfired, showing that it’s becoming ever harder for them to keep trying to make this investigation go away.

 



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Trump Budget Proposes Deep Cuts in Energy Innovation Programs

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The budget would radically scale back public financing for federal energy research. The Energy Department focuses on the next generation of energy technologies — from advanced nuclear reactors to algae biofuels — conducting basic research in its network of 17 national laboratories, and aiding private firms struggling to bring risky new technologies to market. Yet Mr. Trump’s proposal envisions sweeping cuts that would neuter most of the agency’s critical energy programs.

Graphic

How Americans Think About Climate Change, in Six Maps

Americans overwhelmingly believe that global warming is happening, and that carbon emissions should be scaled back. But fewer are sure that it will harm them personally.



OPEN Graphic


The agency’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, which has helped nudge down the cost of solar power, faces a 69 percent cut. The Office of Fossil Energy, which invests in methods for capturing carbon dioxide from coal plants and burying it underground, faces a 54 percent cut. The Office of Nuclear Energy, which is pursuing technology to help extend the life of the United States’ existing nuclear reactors, faces a 31 percent cut.

The Trump administration’s proposal was heavily influenced by the Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank that argues that the federal government should fund only very basic scientific research and get out of the business of helping companies commercialize new energy technologies.

Accordingly, Mr. Trump’s proposal would provide no funds for initiatives like the Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing program, which in 2010 provided Tesla with a crucial $465 million loan six months before the electric car manufacturer went public.

In the natural resources sections of the budget, the administration proposes opening up the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil and gas drilling, estimating that royalties and fees from exploring for fossil fuels in the protected area could generate $1.8 billion in new federal revenue by 2027. But drilling in the Arctic refuge is an intensely contentious proposal that has failed repeatedly in Congress.

Mr. Trump also proposes repealing a portion of a 2006 law that diverted about 37 percent of the revenues from oil and gas drilling in the Gulf of Mexico to Louisiana, Texas, Mississippi and Alabama from the federal government.

The White House estimates that repealing the law and redirecting the state oil revenue back to Washington could yield $3.5 billion over 10 years. Those states, and the oil lobby, are expected to push back fiercely.

The budget also proposes selling off half of the oil in the federal government’s 700,000-barrel Strategic Petroleum Reserve, which was established after the oil crises of the 1970s to provide a cushion against unexpected shortages. In a news conference on Tuesday, Mr. Trump’s budget director, Mick Mulvaney, argued that it was “no longer necessary” to hold so much crude in reserve, thanks to the boom in domestic oil and gas drilling over the last decade.



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Graphic: How 2016 Became Earth’s Hottest Year on Record


The administration estimates that selling the oil will generate a profit of $16.5 billion over 10 years. While the Energy Department has the authority to sell some oil in the reserve, such a major reduction would almost certainly need action from Congress, and the prospects of success for such a move are unclear.

“There are credible arguments that the optimal size of the S.P.R. should be smaller than it is,” Mr. Bordoff said. “But if we’re selling off a big chunk of a national security asset that we’ve held for 40 years, that should be rooted in a detailed analysis of the country’s energy needs, not short-term budget considerations.”

In the meantime, Congress will probably resist major changes to federal research spending. Last week, a group of six Republican senators, led by Lamar Alexander of Tennessee, wrote a letter to the White House warning against dramatic reductions at the agency. “Federally funded research is imperative to ensuring we meet our energy, science and national security needs for generations to come,” they wrote.

Mr. Trump’s budget also proposes a drastic restructuring of the way electricity is bought and sold in Western states, which rely heavily on cheap hydroelectric power generated by huge government structures like the Hoover Dam in Nevada. Mr. Trump proposes selling off thousands of miles of government-owned transmission lines that move this electricity to homes across nearly 20 Western states, from Arizona to Wyoming, creating estimated revenue of about $10 billion over a decade.

Senator Maria Cantwell of Washington, the ranking Democrat on the Senate Energy Committee, said the plan had no chance.

“Selling government-owned transmission lines to the highest bidder will just have the effect of jacking up power rates, and no one in that region is going to be in favor of this,” she said.

The proposal would also restart the Nuclear Waste Fund fee program, which charges electricity users money to be funneled toward construction of the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste dump in Nevada, with estimated revenues of about $3 billion over 10 years. But that money would be specifically earmarked for construction of the nuclear waste repository, which has been mired in delays and political disputes for decades.

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Salman Abedi named by police as Manchester bomber

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Melania Trump still doesn’t want to hold the president’s hand

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President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump walk down the stairs of Air Force One on their arrival to the Fiumicino Airport in Rome, Italy, 23 May 2017. (Photo: Massimo Percossi, epa)

Melania Trump is making headlines over her apparent refusal to hold the president’s hand.

Example one happened Monday, when she and President Trump were walking down the tarmac after landing in Israel. She appears to swat his hand away.

Example two took place Tuesday, when the pair were disembarking from their plane in Rome. The president appears to reach for his wife’s hand, but Melania quickly moves it away, brushing hair out of her face.

Why does it seem to matter? Maybe because we haven’t seen such a stir over a physical gesture before.

Below, a photo history of the last five presidents and first ladies who can show the Trumps how it’s done:

2016: Barack and Michelle Obama

2008: George W. and Laura Bush

2000: Bill and Hillary Clinton

1989: George H.W. and Barbara Bush

1985: Ronald and Nancy Reagan

And a reminder that the Trumps did hold hands on Inauguration Day:

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Cannes cancels events, holds moment of silence to grieve for Manchester

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Nicole Kidman, Josh Hartnett, Salma Hayek and Colin Farrell say the attack on Ariana Grande fans in Manchester was ‘devastating’ and ‘horrifying’. (May 23)
AP

CANNES, France — The Cannes Film Festival came to a brief halt Tuesday afternoon, as festival organizers and patrons honored the victims of Monday’s attack at the Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England.

At 3 p.m. local time, festival director Thierry Frémaux led a minute of silence from the red-carpeted steps of the Palais headquarters, where he was joined by actress Isabelle Huppert, festival president Pierre Lescure and employees.

“We are a festival of peace,” said Fremaux, in a show of solidarity with the victims, their families and the British people. Twenty-two people were killed, including children, and 59 more were injured in Monday’s explosion, which went off at 10:33 p.m. local time at the 21,000-seat Manchester Arena, where Grande had just wrapped her sold-out show.

“Culture, youth and festive spirit were again targeted and struck,” festival organizers said in a statement. “Freedom, generosity and tolerance have been struck, all things to which the festival and all those who make it possible — artists, professionals and spectators — are deeply attached.”

Disney called off a promotional event for Cars 3 on Tuesday because of the blast, and Cannes canceled a fireworks display scheduled for its 70th anniversary celebration. No other events in the city had been canceled or postponed as of Tuesday evening, according to Marie Junk, a news service assistant for the city of Cannes.

Cannes spokeswoman Aurélie Foucherot said there were no updates on security measures at the festival, although safety protocol appeared to be consistent with the rest of the festival, which kicked off last Wednesday.

The streets surrounding the Palais were blocked off and guarded by armed officers carrying machine guns, while local Cannes police carrying handguns checked the bags of people entering the area. To get inside the Palais, festival patrons were also required to go through metal detectors, bag and ID badge checks, and scans with detector wands by security personnel.

Security has been at a “maximum since the beginning of the festival, so there are no (additional) measures (to be taken) since the Manchester attack,” Junk said.

Cannes Mayor David Lisnard assured festival-goers that security measures were at their highest and that Cannes would continue to carry “the universal message of culture, in a spirit of openness.”

Celebrities including Will Smith, Tilda Swinton, Eva Longoria,  Adrien Brody and Marion Cotillard walked the red carpet for the anniversary celebration Tuesday evening. Nicole Kidman, whose SundanceTV miniseries Top of the Lake: China Girl premiered earlier that day, shared her condolences for the victims and their families.

“It’s devastating, devastating for the families that are going through this now,” Kidman said. “It’s not even to be discussed. It’s just to … pray for them.”

Contributing: The Associated Press

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Instagram, Snapchat, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube: How social media sites rank for mental health

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Instagram is the most detrimental social media platform to young people’s mental health, according to new research out of the U.K.

Researchers from the Royal Society for Public Health in conjunction with the Young Health Movement published the report entitled #StatusOfMind, which looks at the positive and negative effects of social media on young people’s health and well-being.

Snapchat ranked the second worst for mental health of the sites reviewed in the report, followed by Facebook. On the plus side, YouTube topped the list as the most positive, with Twitter coming in after it.

The researchers surveyed almost 1,500 teens and young people aged 14 to 24 from across the U.K. to score how each of the social media platforms they use impacts 14 specific factors related to their health and well-being.

These included emotional support, depression, body image, loneliness, sleep, self-expression, self-identity, community building, and bullying, among others.

Based on the ratings participants gave each social media platform, the five most popular were given a net average score to establish the following ranking:

  1. YouTube (most positive)
  2. Twitter
  3. Facebook
  4. Snapchat
  5. Instagram (most negative)

Social media has been described as more addictive than cigarettes and alcohol, and is now so entrenched in the lives of young people that it is no longer possible to ignore it when talking about young people’s mental health issues,” Shirley Cramer, the chief executive of the Royal Society for Public Health, said in a statement.

Cramer notes that both Instagram and Snapchat “are very image-focused and it appears they may be driving feelings of inadequacy and anxiety in young people.”

“Instagram easily makes girls and women feel as if their bodies aren’t good enough as people add filters and edit their pictures in order for them to look ‘perfect,'” one participant from Northern Ireland wrote.

Another said: “Anonymous bullying online over Twitter around personal things has led to me self-harming and left afraid of going to school. Bullying on Instagram has lead me to attempt suicide and also self-harm. Both caused me to experience depressive episodes and anxiety.”

Social media is far more prevalent in younger generations and many young people have never known a world without instant access to the internet and social media platforms.

A number of studies in recent years have raised concerns about the potential health effects of frequent social media use on young people – particularly when it comes to mental health.

While the researchers acknowledge there is still much to be learned about social media’s impact on mental health, they say these are important conversations that need to be further explored, especially surrounding young people who are the most vulnerable to potential harms.

The report also discusses ways to reduce the risks and calls for action from government and social media companies to help promote positive aspects of social media.

These recommendations include:

  • A pop-up “heavy usage warning” on social media – 7 in 10 young people surveyed supported the idea of getting an alert if they exceed a set level of usage on a site.
  • Spotting troubled users 4 out of 5 supported social media platforms identifying users who could be suffering from mental health problems by their posts, and discretely signposting ways for them to get support.
  • Pointing out photo manipulations – more than two-thirds of the young people surveyed believe social media platforms should highlight when photos of people have been digitally manipulated.

“For young people, using social media and digital technologies as a tool to help with mental health make sense for many reasons,” said Dr. Becky Inkster, Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Cambridge. “Social media is a part of their daily lives and so care could be delivered in a lifestyle-integrated, self-managed approach.”

She also says social media offers a unique opportunity to communicate with young people in creative ways.

“As health professionals we must make every attempt to understand modern youth culture expressions, lexicons, and terms to better connect with their thoughts and feelings,” Inkster said.

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Cortez Kennedy, N.F.L. Hall of Fame Defensive Tackle, Dies at 48

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Cortez Kennedy at the 2012 Pro Football Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremony.

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Jason Miller/Getty Images

Cortez Kennedy, the Seahawks Hall of Fame defensive tackle, was found dead Tuesday, the Orlando police said. He was 48.

There was no immediate word of cause of death. The police told ESPN “there is nothing suspicious to report.”

A native of Arkansas, Kennedy played at Miami, where he was an all-American. Drafted No. 3 over all by the Seahawks, he played his entire 11-year career in Seattle. He earned eight Pro Bowl selections and had 58 sacks and more than 500 tackles in his career. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2012.

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When he made his first big professional payday, he bought six cars: one for his mother, one for his girlfriend and four for himself. After his financial adviser sent him the bill for auto insurance, he sold two of his cars and said he had been careful with his money since.

After his career, Kennedy worked as an adviser to the New Orleans Saints.

“He doesn’t have an official title, but I like having him around because he’s a good role model,” said Mickey Loomis, the general manager, in 2015. “This is a guy who had a lot of success, was able to protect what he earned, lived a good lifestyle and has done well 15 years after his career ended.”

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Egypt moves bed, chariot of King Tut to new museum

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Egypt has safely transported two unique items, a funerary bed and a chariot belonging to the famed pharaoh King Tutankhamun from a museum in central Cairo to a new one on the other side of the city.

The two gold-plated artifacts, which were moved on Tuesday, are the biggest items that have so far been transported to the Grand Egyptian Museum, scheduled to open in early 2018. Moving King Tut’s items has become a particularly sensitive issue since 2014, when the beard attached to the Egyptian monarch’s priceless golden mask was accidentally broken and hastily glued back with an epoxy, damaging the mask and causing uproar among archaeologists.

The tomb of King Tut, who ruled Egypt over 3,000 years ago, was discovered in 1922 in the southern city of Luxor.



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